Published on:

Child Hospitalized After Near Drowning at Jungle Island

A seven year old boy was hospitalized after nearly drowning at Jungle Island in Miami.  The popular local and tourist destination became the scene of a near death when the boy, who was on a field trip with his summer camp, took off his life jacket and attempted to swim to one of the inflatable floats.  Supervisors noticed the boy struggling to stay above water and signaled to lifeguards.  One of the lifeguards pulled the boy out and performed CPR until paramedics arrived. A spokeswoman for Jungle Island said the accident occurred near Parrot Cove and paramedics arrived within minutes.  The boy was crying by the time help arrived and was in stable condition when transported to the hospital.  Jungle Island is cooperating with officials in the investigation into the matter.

Drowning accidents in Miami are a major concern for many parents because children are around water all the time.  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that nearly 4,000 people die from drowning every year. Fortunately, camp supervisors were able to recognize that this young child was in distress before it was too late.  Drowning, however, can be difficult to spot.  The following is a primer on what drowning looks like.  By recognizing a drowning child or adult, you could save their life.

How to Tell if Someone is Drowning

            There is a common misconception that people or children who are drowning will shout for help, wave their arms in the air, and appear to be struggling to stay afloat.  These actions are in fact called thrashing. Trashing is a sign that someone is experiencing aquatic distress.  Anyone acting in this manner should immediately be pulled out of the water.  Spotting someone while they are still in the stages of aquatic distress is the ideal outcome because these individuals will be fine once removed from the water.

Those that are truly drowning will often not make any noise.  When you are drowning, you have past the point of being able to call out for help.  Instead, a drowning person’s head will generally be low in the water with their mouth at water level or their head tipped back and their mouth open.  Their eyes may appear vacant or glossy and unable to focus on their surroundings.  A drowning person will often not be using their legs and will appear to be vertical in the water.  They may still be trying to swim but are not making any headway.  They could appear to be climbing an invisible ladder or attempting to roll on to their back.  They will generally turn to face land or stairs if in the pool.

When you see these signs, it is imperative that you seek help for the drowning individual.  Call 911, signal a lifeguard, or provide the person with a flotation device.  Act fast as CPR may be necessary to save the drowning person’s life.

Greenberg Stone and Urbano: Over 130 Years of Collective Experience

            Drowning accidents claim the lives of thousands each year and they are entirely preventable.  If you have lost a child to a drowning accident or been injured in a near drowning, the Miami Personal Injury Attorneys at Greenberg Stone and Urbano are here to help.  For over 130 collective years, we have assisted accident victims in bringing personal injury as well as wrongful death claims across South Florida. Our dedication to providing superior legal services and client centered approach has earned us an AV rating from Martindale Hubbell and recognition as one of South Florida’s top firms by the Miami Herald.   Allow our exceptional attorneys to provide you with excellence of legal services.  Call us at (888) 499-9700 or (305) 595-2400 or visit our website to schedule your initial consultation.

 

Contact Information